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it not change with things like civil rights things like gay rights. what is it about this issue? >> reporter: well, one of the hard things since it's legalized, most people especially younger women have come to expect this is their right, they have the right to this care. we're not out there demanding something new but we're encouraging to keep the right we already have. so it's not quite the same for a struggle in guy rights or something new. for this generation it's maintain what we already have so you're not going to see as much enthusiasm. now people are seeing what can happen if you take for grants the right to have access to an abortion care and people are starting to push back. i'm optimistic about how we feel about this going forward. >> michael: that's a great answer to the question. that's exactly right. it's keeping it right rather than trying to get a new right. that makes a difference. it's also a big difference to keep news coverage of this alive all the time. thank you kate sheppard from mother jones magazine for coming on "the war room"." we have a progressive from a red stat
for everybody. he also talked about the civil rights movement. i think the idea behind this of s of basic equality and opportunity. our country is founded on those principles. when he talked about immigration today, again, it was opportunity and equality and he's going to fight for that just as he had his entire career he's going to do that for the next four years. his hope-- as we had the national day of service yesterday sds that ordinary americans get involved. get engaged with their country whether through volunteerism, whether through letting their voices be heard as we try to pursue legislation in washington it's a spirit of for engagement and that was a big part of what the president was saying today. we don't have to solve all of our problems but let's not put the short-term political interests ahead of the american people. >> schieffer: ms. jarrett, it's bob schieffer here. i wanted to ask you, because you do know the president so well. republicans i keep hearing say, well, they think the president doesn't like them. they say he doesn't like politics. that he doesn't like to get
in 1963. one of the great heroes of the civil rights movement. myrlie evers-williams will be giving the invocation at the beginning of the ceremonies and then we will see justice sonia sotomayor who is one of the newer associate justices on the supreme court. she will be delivering the oath of office to the vice president. this is beyonce coming in now and we will be hearing from her. there are several musical performances today. after the vice president is sworn in, james taylor will be singing "america the beautiful." then following that, john roberts, jr., the chief justice of the united states will administer the oath of office to the president. we just saw 88-year-old jimmy carter arriving on the scene. former presidents are almost always in attendance at these events, but today, george herbert walker bush and his son, george w. bush are not in attendance. the elder mr. bush has recently been released from a month-long stay in the hospital due to a respiratory ailment and so both bush families announced that they would not be able to attend because of the poor health of the eld
, the city of clinton was in the midst of a civil rights struggle. after what and restored a black neighborhood was firebombed, police officers and firefighters arrived to extinguish the flames but came under gunfire. an african-american teen was killed by police that night, a white man was shot and killed the next day. the national guard moved in. nine black men and one white woman were rounded up, hustled off to jail for their alleged involvement. the young defendants, the majority just high school age, were collectively sentenced to a total of more than 280 years in prison. rev. ben chavis served more than five years in prison. shortly after he appeared on "democracy now!" last month, governor perdue issued pardons of innocence for the wilmington 10. the move came after newly surfaced documents revealed the prosecutor in the case made racially biased notes next to potential jurors, writing comments like "kkk good." i asked rev. chavis last night what it felt like to be attending president of the inauguration on dr. martin luther king day, after finally being pardoned. >> this is
campaigners before it had even started. demonstrators against the bill say are just fighting for civil rights. >> i am liberal. i am for freedom for all. for gay people and other minorities, too. >> this is not about sex in public, but a quick kiss or holding someone's hand -- that's just normal. >> the bill has two more readings. it then goes to the upper house, and president putin for approval. if passed, it could lead to fines for what it calls homosexual propaganda. supporters say the aim is to protect russian children. >> i am going to vote in favor of the bill. god created people of different sexes so that we do not get up to such nonsense. and many russians share his view, but critics of the bill say it will only worsen hostilities that gay people face. gay rights campaigners were attacked earlier this week as they protested against the bill. >> the majority of the russian population is more conservative and rejects homosexuality. critics say the new law would be another step on the path away from freedom and democracy. m a german business confidence has risen to a seven-month high, be
of repression and limitation of civil rights guaranteed by the constitution of the russian federation. >> several russian cities have already passed similar local laws. the move to legislate on the federal level enjoys popular support. surveys showed 2/3 of the russian public find homosexuality morally unacceptable. the bill has been criticized by human-rights groups, including the kremlin's human rights council. bbc news in moscow. >> stocks rose today as the euro hit an 11-month high. investors took heart that europe's financial crisis may have eased. it is ironic as the situation improves, the real economic situation for many europeans its worst -- gets worse. the british economy shrunk more than expected. the belgian economy is just as bleak. throughout northern and southern europe, the fear is losing your job. >> the fire has been burning for three months fell, who arming the striking workers. they are the latest victims of europe's economic crisis. say goodbye to the sprawling ford factory in eastern belgium. it is shutting down. with europe in recession, they are not selling en
. [laughter] >> i was lucky enough to be there for all of them. >> the president spoke about selma, civil rights, seneca falls, stonewalled, where the modern gay rights movement was born. the couple of things happen. congress will have an impact on the administration. harry reid and mitch monnell of reaching an agreement on the filibuster, nothing profound, but that they will raise the debt ceiling to may 18. how will this impact the presidency? >> what the house did is a sign of what is ahead of us. they have not gone over the defeat from november. they have no leverage. they disvered theyave e leverage and now have to wait to back down. this is a face-saving device to kick it down the road until may. the president is in a much stronger position in dealing with the republicans in the house. >> do you agree with that? >> i always respect colby's opinion, but the president, like any reelected president, essentially, absent a national event where he becomes a dramatic figure, watches his popularity be rationed out day- by-day. he is strong now. it is hard to believe that he will be as stron
of civil rights, selma, and stonewall, manhattan bossuet's the village where the modern gay rights movement was born. a couple of things happened in congress this week that may have an impact -- will have an impact on the administration. harry reid and mitch mcconnell reaching an agreement on the filibuster. nothing profound. also, they will raise the debt ceiling to may 18. how will this impact president? >> what the house did it is illustrative of what will be ahead of us. they have not gotten over the defeat from november 6. we are going to tie everything to the debt ceiling, this budget crisis. they have no leverage over the president. they discover they have no leverage. now they have to find a way to back down. this is their face-saving device to kick it down the road until may. you will see more of this. the president is in a much stronger position of dealing with the congress and house republicans. >> you agree with that? >> i always respect colby's opinion. but i dissent, the president, like any other, absent a national event where he becomes the dominant central dramatic figure, w
, civil rights and as you mentioned stonewall manhattan's west village where the modern gay rights movement was born. a couple of things happen. harry reid and mitch mcconnell of reaching someort of agreement on the filibuster. nothing profound. also, they will raise the debtbt ceiling tmay 18. how will this have an impact on the president? >> they are still going to -- they he not gotten over the defeat from november 6. we are going to tie everything to the debt ceiling.. now they have the letter. it discovered that they have no leverage. now have to find a way to back down. this is their face saving device to k kick it down the road until may.y. the president is in a much stronger position in dealing with the house republicans. >> agree with that? >> all with respect colby's opinion. the president, like any reelected president essentially, absent a national event where he becomes the dominant and central dramatic fire, watches his popularity be rationed out day by day. he is strong now. it is hard to believe he will be as strong a year from now. i think what we are facing iss not
is the country's oldest civil rights group joining a lawsuit against the city of new york? we'll tell you, then a little bit later this hour, why some kentucky insiders are warning ashley judd away from a senate run. you're watching msnbc, the place for politics. ♪ ♪ ♪ tossing and turning have given way to sleeping. where sleepless nights yield to restful sleep. and lunesta®(eszopiclone) can help you get there. like it has for so many people before. when taking lunesta, don't drive or operate machinery until you feel fully awake. walking, eating, driving, or engaging in other activities while asleep, without remembering it the next day, have been reported. lunesta should not be taken together with alcohol. abnormal behaviors may include aggressiveness, agitation, hallucinations, or confusion. in depressed patients, worsening of depression, including risk of suicide, may occur. alcohol may increase these risks. allergic reactions such as tongue or throat swelling occur rarely and may be fatal. side effects may include unpleasant taste, headache, dizziness, and morning drowsiness. as
in the first layperson to deliver an inaugural invocation. she is the widow of medgar evers, the civil-rights activist who was assassinated 50 years ago. >> 150 years after the emancipation proclamation and 50 years after the march on washington, we celebrate the spirit of our ancestors, which has allowed us to move from a nation of unborn hopes and history of disenfranchised folks to today's expiration of a more perfect union the a-expression of a more perfect union. we ask that where our paths seem blanketed by oppression and rippled by pangs of despair, we ask for your guidance toward the light of deliverance. and hose who came before us and dreamed of this day, that we recognize that their visions still inspire us. they are a great cloud of witnesses, unseen by the naked eye, but all around us, thankful that they're living was not in vain. for every mountain, you gave us the strength to climb, your grace is pleaded to continue that climb for america and the world. >> myrlie evers delivering the inaugural invocation. o misled, president of emmett if his inaugural address. >> week, the peop
couldn't happen. civil rights, womens rights, don't ask don't tell, sometimes quickly, sometimes slowly. change will happen when we work for it as a country. >> this will not work or make a difference. >> what will make a difference? >> prosecute guys that commit crimes. >> a minister asked the crowd to pray in the direction of the white house to wish the obama administration success in passing tighter gun control laws. >> tens of thousands of protestors took to the streets of san francisco for the anniversary of legalizing abortion. pro-life protestors marched down market street from the civic center to justin herman plaza demanding roe v wade be turned over. a law student who testified before congress about contraception was a guest speaker. >> there is a more profound sight about access. about affordability and insurance coverage and making sure people especially in rural areas have access. >> i would like to see everyone question abortion more. they say it should be legal and safe they don't talk about rare. >> as many as 40,000 people attended the pro-life rally. it's the biggest a
, the issue of choice is, in fact, wrapped up with women's reproductive almost -- these are civil rights issues on a lot of levels. how is a transvaginal ultrasound not a violation of privacy. >> i think with michael, i would say to you, i have read what you say about this, i do believe that republican values are sort of -- have -- they've lost hold in the party in many ways, as a party of believing in individual rights, individual responsibilities, no government intrusion, except in this arena, and i think we can agree this is a deeply personal issue. it's one that should be made by women, their doctors, their families, and not by politicians. >> it becomes a little bit of a conflict when you argue for the right of individuals to make, you know, choices and then you start to limit those choices, which is the societial argument that you have. the question i have, to the point you just raised, alex, about how this generation as "the times" pointed out, are they diffusing the ultimate he message here, or conversation when they -- in the context of talking about reproductive routes or abort
civil rights groups is taking a stand in support of beverage companies. the new york chapter of the naacp is backing a lawsuit filed to try and stop the city. hazel dukes is the new york chapter president. >> it's not about race. >> reporter: it's about? >> economic disparity. and how the small business is being punished while we allow the big corporate people, again, have their own way. >> reporter: convenience stores like 7-eleven are exempt. the naacp, along with the hispanic federation, argue that small and minority-owned businesses will feel is a disproportionate impact. then, there's the obesity epidemic. non-hispanic blacks, according to the cdc, have the highest rates of obesity at 44%, followed by mexican americans at 39%. the naacp followed a legal brief in support of beverage companies, saying, to tackle the public health crisis of obesity, it's developed a holistic, educational program called project help. the funding for that project, according to the naacp's website, is the coca-cola foundation, the philanthropic arm of the company. duke says the new york chapte
is getting high-profile, but unlikely support. one of the nation's oldest civil rights groups is taking a stand in support of beverage companies. the new york chapter of the naacp is backing a lawsuit to try and stop the city. hazel dukes the new york chapter president. >> it's not about race. >> it's about -- >> economic disparity and how the small business is being punished while we allow the big, corporate people, again, to have their own way. >> convenience stores like 7-eleven are exempt. the naacp argue that small and minority owned businesses will feel a disproportionate impact. nonhispanic blacks have the highest rates of obesity at 44%, followed by mexican americans at 39%. the naacp filed a legal brief, to say to tackle the public health crisis on obesity, it developed a holistic educational program, called project health. the funding for that according to the naacp's website is the coca-cola foundation, the philanthropic arm of the company. the new york chapter received $75,000 in the past two years. is there a conflict? >> absolutely not. >> if this was the first time coca-c
, in the speech the president also broke ground by promising to push for expanded civil rights for gays and lesbians. aside from his health care reform law, this could be the greatest legacy, the biggest legacy of his time in office. a case that is now before the supreme court could force the administration into making new federal policy on this front. it could force the administration to decide whether federal benefits will be extended to same-sex couples in the next year, wolf. >> so now that he's laid out very specifically -- i was surprised how specific he went yesterday in the inaugural address, his priorities for the second term, i assume in his state of the union address in february that he he will go into details with more specifics. is that what you're hearing? >> reporter: yes, wolf. i was not surprised that he laid out sign posts about where he wanted to make progress. what he wasn't going to do in this speech was get into detail. so where he laid out markers on these major issues, we will now hear much more policy detail in the state of the union and the white house is sayin
rights is of the same standing as the civil rights movement from selma to stonewall. wasn't president obama himself not in favor of gay marriage until six months ago? do you have to believe in same-sex marriage if you believe in the principles of the declaration of independence? i don't think so. i don't think most americans think that's just obviously the right thing to be for if you believe in the american declaration of independence and constitution. jon: always good to get your insights. bill kristol from "the weekly standard," thank you. arthel? arthel: we have a fox news extreme weather alert now as an arctic blast creates dangerous conditions across the country. police in ohio blaming sudden snow bursts for triggering a deadly chain reaction pile-up near cincinnati. one person died and at least 20 others were rushed to the hospital, some in critical condition. officers at the scene say there may have been 86 cars involved in that crash. while a separate crash in the same area damaged up to 50 more cars. the snow causing horrible conditions there, in new york as well, in our law
time ago. it was 1967. and i remember very well senator baker's story about how the civil rights bill in 1968 was passed. i discussed this with the republican leader before. he knows that era as well or better than i do. but there was a time when senator baker said he was in everett dirksen's office, the man who had the job senator mcconnell now has. he was the republican leader then. he said he heard the telephone ring and heard only one end of the conversation, but senator dirksen was saying, no, mr. president, i cannot come down and have a drink with you tonight. i did that last night and louella is very unhappy with me. and that was the conversation. about 30 minutes later there was a rustle out in the outer office, the office senator mcconnell holds, and two beagles came in and lyndon johnson, the president, said to the republican leader, everett, if you don't have a drink wh me, i'm down here to have one with you and the disperiod for 45 -- and they disappeared for 45 minutes. the point of that is it was in that very office, the republican leader's office in 1968, the next year
to stonewall in such a clear and simple phrase he captured the struggle of some many of us, the civil rights challenge of so many of us. we need to engage in the conversation. host: what do you expect from the congress in this area? guest: much has happened in the congress. out efforts were mostly about blocking bad things from happening. we did that in the early 2000's. i see parallels with reducing gun violence with marriage equality and support for the gay and lesbian community. we see support from republicans for marriage equality and support from democrats. continued efforts to pass the respect for marriage act, which would get rid of the defense for marriage act. i see the courts -- the supreme court is taking up marriage equality. they will be heard in march with a decision heard in june. there has been a shift in public attitudes, just as i see a shift on reducing gun violence. host: good morning. caller: i watch the news a lot and i see the shootings and the mass shootings are committed by the mentally ill. i have a son and i see this and my son. no gun control law would control him
creed. >> gretchen: as the rest rand and civil rights leader his words transformed a nation, after nearly 50 years of delivering his most famous speech, what would dr. king think about how we're handling race relations and other issues today. let's ask somebody who would know, alveda king is the niece of dr. martin luther king. and they've written a new book, mar lute king, jr., a king family tribute. what a beautiful book. >> good morning, and thank you so much. all of our family members have contributed to that book, remembering the martin luther king, jr. we knew and loved. and so, it's wonderful that you would even ask what would he be doing today. and he'd be doing the same thing that he was doing then. you know, he spoke with billy graham in madison square garden in his lifetime and he preached the bible and today the bible is front and center again, his bible and president lincoln's bible. so you have 150 years of the emancipation proclamation and 50 years of the dream and they're represented by those two bibles today. >> gretchen: it's so unbelievable it will be the bible f
supporting women's rights around the world and engaging with civil society and restoring and maintaining influence in a very difficult era. i would have thought that your last hearing would be a chance to give us advice for what to do-ovdo over the next four years and beyond. i take seriously your strong advice that it's about time we pass a reauthorization bill through both houses. instead we are here on i guess the third hearing to deal with the tragic events of benghazi because it's a chance to beat up on the other party. we can talk about how you were not provided with resources and the administration inside the state department. i hope that maybe we would get you to come back again. i realize that would be gratis. you wouldn't be on the payroll at that time. with the hearing i would like to have, getting your input on the bigger issues of foreign policy. ultimately the security of our diplomats depens on the host country. this is all a discussion about there might have been five security people on the ground if only there was more funning and deployment and that cable and this cable
'sritis around the world, en-- women's rights around the world, engaging in civil society and restoring and maintaining american influence in a very difficult era. and i would have thought that your last hearing would be your chance to give us some advice for what to do over the next conscious over the next four years and beyond. i take seriously your very strong advice because i happen to agree with it, that it's about time we pass an authorization bill through both houses of congress. but instead we're here at i guess our third hearing to deal with the tragic events in benghazi because it is a chance for each political party to beat up on the other. we can talk about how republicans didn't provide you with resources, we can talk about the administration inside the state department. so i would hope that maybe we'd get you to come back again. i realize that would be grats i, you wouldn't be on the government payroll at that time and do the hearing that i'd like to have. which is getting your input on the bigger issues of foreign policy. ultimately the security of our diplomats depend on
of civilized countries to have an apparatus to be able to take down and rend asunder terrorist groups wherever they appear. >> schieffer: all right, dianne feinstein, thank you so much. >> thank you very much. >> schieffer: we're going to get a slightly different take on all this now. we're going to new york and police commissioner ray kelly. commissioner, you just heard senator feinstein. do you think-- is this the right way to approach this? is banning assault weapons where you start banning these magazines that hold more than, say, 10 rounds? or do you see it in a different way there in new york? >> well, i commend the senator. i i think it's certainly a move in the right direction. i agree with it. as the senator said, it's probably a heavy lift in congress, but for us in new york city. >> and believe in most urban centers of america, the problem really is concealable handguns. only 2% of the people that we've arrested for guns in the last two years have had assault weapons. we don't want them on the streets. make no mistake about it, but the problem is the handgun. 60% of the murders in n
to enforce sanctions on iran, your work supporting women's rights are around the world, and teaching with civil society and maintaining american influence in a difficult era. i would have thought the last hearing would be your chance to give us some advice for what to do over the next four years and beyond. instead our third hearing to deal with the tragic events in benghazi because it is a chance for each political party to beat up on the other. we can talk about how republicans did not provide you with resources, the administration inside the state department. i would hope maybe we get you to come back again. i realize that would -- he would not be on the government table at that time. getting your input on the bigger issues of foreign policy. ultimately the security of our diplomats depends on the whole country. this is all a discussion about that might have been five security people on the ground. if only there had been more funding, this cable, that cable. much of the to more protection, might have led to more casualties. -- might have lead to more protection, might have led to
exhibition on the civil war is abolition and emancipation. we are fortunate that those men came of age when they did. they make issues around the emancipation and abolition issues around human rights and american freedom on a general non-race specific level. i will go through every piece of information that johnson was in this paper -- picture. if you pay attention to the top half as well as the bottom half, you will get a dark skinned black woman holding a white child. there is a ladder and a bolt of fabric coming out the other window. there is a rooster appear. roosters have a habit in the evening of finding a perch and call into the hands to spend the night with him. the hen is on top of the slate orders. if you add all of the inns and outs and look down here at the white girl answering the backyard -- entering the back yard, some of you have said she is coming to hear the music, she is the mistress. she is not here to see the music. no one is paying attention to her. is she a product of one of those liaisons? >> the civil war and its influence on american artist. part of american histor
Search Results 0 to 36 of about 37 (some duplicates have been removed)

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